As you’ve noticed, I often mine Alex Sanfilippo’s Creating a Brand podcasts for “golden nuggets”. I found a real gem to share with you this week, I think! I hope you agree.

Michelle Tillis Lederman and I have been connected on LinkedIn for some time. Her approach to communication and teamwork fits right in with mine. Michelle refers to herself as the relationship-driven leaders’ coach. When I saw her name on Sanfilippo’s website, I promptly listened to their conversation.

In this interview, Michelle focuses on 3 of the main points from her recent book, The Connector’s Advantage. I bought the book and read the introduction and first chapter. I recommend it! You can buy it at the link above ($9.99 on Kindle)

  • Connectors are open and accepting. Authenticity is a major part of this. You must be comfortable with who you are to be open and accepting. Hiding behind a false façade makes this impossible.
  • Connectors believe in abundance. A scarcity mindset makes deep connections impossible. An example she focuses on in business: When someone else lands the customer you wanted, what’s your reaction? Are you happy for the customer and the company they’re working with? Do you hope to learn something from what the other company did to win this client? A connector believes there are plenty of prospects in the market. They believe the customer that belongs with them will buy from them.
  • Connectors have a generous spirit. This goes with the abundance mindset. Connecting with someone is a gift. Connecting two other people is a double gift. Connections are gifts. Compliments are gifts. Of course, so are physical things. It’s important also to be generous to yourself. Be willing to say no, and be OK with it, when you can’t give as fully as you would like to.

Practicing gratitude with intention is a great way to help yourself exhibit these qualities. A great question to ask yourself often, especially when you’re having a tough day: “What’s the best thing about today?”

Michelle’s belief is that being a connector is always a learned skill. Nobody is born as a connector. No doubt it’s easier for some to learn than others.

When I heard her say this, I thought, “I’m a natural connector”. Reviewing my history though, I’d have to admit that I learned to be a connector. It’s something I learned quite easily. I seemed to recognize the benefits of being a connector without much urging from anyone. However, I wasn’t born with a “connection muscle”. Michelle is probably correct in saying no one is.

What I’ve written here is a mere sketch of what Michelle and Alex cover in their conversation. Check it out!

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